maliciousglamour:

Photographer: George Hoyningen-Huene
Evening dress by Jay Thorpe, 1936

(via back-to-classics)

kittenindustries:

Charlotte Rampling & Helmut Berger in Jardin des Finzi-Contini, 1968. Directed by Vittorio De Sica. 

(via cosmic-vibrations)

onlyoldphotography:

Alfred Eisenstaedt: Leonard Bernstein conducting Mahler’s Second Symphony during a New York Philharmonic rehearsal at Carnegie Hall. 1960

(via onlyoldphotography)

gingerrogerss:

Vivien Leigh resting on the set of Gone With the Wind (1939)

gingerrogerss:

Vivien Leigh resting on the set of Gone With the Wind (1939)

(via missavagardner)

pixography:

René Magritte ~ "The Lovers", 1928

The origin of these disturbing images has been attributed to various sources in Magritte’s imagination. Like many of his Surrealist associates, Magritte was fascinated by ‘Fantomas’, the shadowy hero of the thriller series which first appeared in novel form in 1913, and shortly after in films made by Louis Feuillade. The identity of ‘Fantomas’ is never revealed; he appears in the films disguised with a cloth or stocking over his head. Another source for the shrouded heads in Magritte’s paintings has been suggested in the memory of his mother’s apparent suicide. In 1912, when Magritte was only thirteen years of age, his mother was found drowned in the river Sambre; when her body was recovered from the river, her nightdress was supposedly wrapped around her head. <source>

pixography:

René Magritte ~ "The Lovers", 1928

The origin of these disturbing images has been attributed to various sources in Magritte’s imagination. Like many of his Surrealist associates, Magritte was fascinated by ‘Fantomas’, the shadowy hero of the thriller series which first appeared in novel form in 1913, and shortly after in films made by Louis Feuillade. The identity of ‘Fantomas’ is never revealed; he appears in the films disguised with a cloth or stocking over his head. Another source for the shrouded heads in Magritte’s paintings has been suggested in the memory of his mother’s apparent suicide. In 1912, when Magritte was only thirteen years of age, his mother was found drowned in the river Sambre; when her body was recovered from the river, her nightdress was supposedly wrapped around her head. <source>

    pixography:

    René Magritte ~ "The Lovers", 1928

    The origin of these disturbing images has been attributed to various sources in Magritte’s imagination. Like many of his Surrealist associates, Magritte was fascinated by ‘Fantomas’, the shadowy hero of the thriller series which first appeared in novel form in 1913, and shortly after in films made by Louis Feuillade. The identity of ‘Fantomas’ is never revealed; he appears in the films disguised with a cloth or stocking over his head. Another source for the shrouded heads in Magritte’s paintings has been suggested in the memory of his mother’s apparent suicide. In 1912, when Magritte was only thirteen years of age, his mother was found drowned in the river Sambre; when her body was recovered from the river, her nightdress was supposedly wrapped around her head. <source>

    (via le-plus-beau-des-mensonges)

    bremser:

    Berenice Abbott, Djuna Barnes, 1926

    (Source : killerbeesting, via alwaysalbrecht)

    lelaid:

    Françoise Hardy in Paco Rabanne shot by Jean Louis Guégan, 1967

    (Source : sheerqueen)

    dustyanswer:

Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s
dustyanswer:

Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s
dustyanswer:

Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s
dustyanswer:

Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s
dustyanswer:

Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s
dustyanswer:

Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s

      dustyanswer:

      Au Bonheur des Dames (Julien Duvivier, 1930) aka the Galeries Lafayette in the late 20s

      Photography by Norman Parkinson, 1951.

      (Source : laurasaxby, via jeannecrains)

      kinoscript:

      L’ETRANGE COULEUR DES LARMES DE TON CORPS - Bruno Forzani & Hélène Cattet (2013)

      spectredelarose:

      Ernst Haas- Ballet Dancers, NY, 1968

      le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht
le-tourbillion:

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht

        le-tourbillion:

        Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht

        (Source : violentsaturdays, via labelleotero)

        (Source : briljantiin)

        chaboneobaiarroyoallende:

“I preferred an artist who transformed his time, not mirrored it.” 
Patti Smith
chaboneobaiarroyoallende:

“I preferred an artist who transformed his time, not mirrored it.” 
Patti Smith
chaboneobaiarroyoallende:

“I preferred an artist who transformed his time, not mirrored it.” 
Patti Smith

          chaboneobaiarroyoallende:

          “I preferred an artist who transformed his time, not mirrored it.” 

          Patti Smith

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